Archive for the “Allen Ginsberg” Category

Beatitude, the Beats and the Truth

Bookmark and Share

Jack Kerouac New York City-based journalist and critical theorist Edward Truth penned a beautifully perceptive piece titled “Bringing Back the Beats with ‘Beatitude’” for Lambda Literary, in which he proposes that Beatitude not only cuts to the heart of the Beat Generation’s ongoing popularity but carves out its own unique sensibility:   “Stylish, descriptive and [...]

“Well-written and appealing”

Bookmark and Share

“[A] well-written and appealing debut novel… Many poets, including Eileen Myles, Bob Rosenthal and Sparrow make appearances, but it is Allen Ginsberg who figures most prominently. A fictional interview at his East 12th Street home feels very realistic and imbues the sometimes irascible Ginsberg with avuncular wisdom… Closs, who has done a great deal of [...]

Postcard from Ferlinghetti: The Flip Side

Bookmark and Share

Since my previous post about receiving a postcard from City Lights Bookstore founder, poet and painter Lawrence Ferlinghetti in response to sending him a copy of Beatitude, several people have asked, “What was on the other side of the postcard?” The flip side featured this iconic and brilliant photograph of several cadets reading Allen Ginsberg’s [...]

Happy Birthday, Allen Ginsberg!

Bookmark and Share

On Sunday, June 3, Allen Ginsberg would have been 86. As anyone who’s read Beatitude knows, I’m a huge fan. Though Ginsberg passed away in 1997, I was fortunate enough to meet him on several occasions. I saw him read at MoMA and I also interviewed him.   Those experiences inspired my take on him in [...]

When Death Stalked the Beats

Bookmark and Share

A New York Times article by true crime author and journalist David J. Krajicek recounts the “violent death” that caught Beat Generation writers Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs in its gravitational pull 10 years prior to their debut on the literary scene.   In 1944, 19-year-old Lucien Carr, who had introduced Kerouac, [...]